User guide

Configuring the WBS

The work breakdown structure can have an unlimited number of levels, or nodes. Instructions for adding, renaming, reordering, changing levels, and deleting are included below. Tip: All nodes and their children...

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The Codes Manager

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] The Codes Manager is a hub for codes functionality, such as defining defining the work breakdown structure (WBS), adding codes, and making assignments. The window itself is non-modal, meaning that you can...

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Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and Codes

A work breakdown structure (WBS) is a hierarchical decomposition of work that breaks down the schedule into manageable sections. It allows for more than just one subcategory, or level, and can...

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Images

Images may be inserted onto the canvas from Windows Explorer or other applications that are an OLE compatible drag source. The following formats are supported: JPEG (.jpg), PNG, TIFF (.tif), GIF, EMF, and...

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Text Boxes and Notepads

Text boxes are notes that show up directly on the canvas. Notepads are notes that do not show up on the canvas. Instead, they are represented by an icon and...

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Shapes

Shapes are low-fidelity, black and white symbols for annotating the canvas. These include arrows, brackets, lines, rectangles, and a circle, for example. Both shapes and shades are added through the...

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Shades

Shades are custom-drawn rectangles of color. They are more flexible than the basic shapes and can be re-sized more naturally. Shades can be used to create a key or legend,...

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Markup Tools

NetPoint provides a number of non-planning objects for adding extra information to the canvas. Such objects do not contribute to the logic of the network but are used merely for...

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Overriding Logic

Logic is a mode whereby object relationships are enforced. When turned on, NetPoint will heal a negative-gap link as it forms to preserve the logic of the original relationship. For...

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Treating Redundancies

The simplest case of a redundant link is a start-to-start (SS) or finish-to-finish (FF) link between two activities that are already finish-to-start (FS) connected. The more complex case of a...

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